Bring Back Those Tales!

This Day Live (Lagos, Nigeria), May 27, 2012 Summary: Many attempts had been made to bring back storytelling on the electronic media. They do not necessarily encourage creativity. How then can the Nigerian or the African folktales become marketable brands? The answer is through creativity. Of course, not all cartoon heroes are moral characters. Some …

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The Placebo Effect, Language and Story

by Mary K. Clark. In Counterclockwise ~ Mindful Health and The Power of Possibility,  Ellen J. Langer explores aging and mindfulness.  The book is a fascinating read on the topic of mindfulness, however, she also explores the effect of placebos and language. The most dramatic example of language acting as placebo can be found in the …

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The Brain, Story and the Written Word

by Mary K.  Clark. Can stories stimulate and possibly even change how we act in life?  Neuroscience is showing that it can according to Annie Murphy Paul in her New York Times Opinion Piece, Your Brain on Fiction. Researchers have long known that the “classical” language regions, like Broca’s area and Wernicke’s area, are involved …

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Our Lives in Fairy Tales

by Mary Grace Ketner Between “Once upon a time” and “happily ever after,” each fairy tale presents a brilliant metaphor for one stage of life. In the course of a fairy tale, the protagonist leaves a state of innocence to navigate a path through territory dense with risks and challenges. With courage, integrity, and persistence, …

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Untold Stories

by Mary K. Clark Though stories may not be shared in spoken or written word, they often are shared between the lines – between moments – seemingly invisible, yet ever present. These are some of my musings after coming upon Holocaust survivors:  Harrowing Ordeals still largely untold written by Petula Dvorak of the Washington Post. …

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Great Storytelling Advice from Moth Founder George Dawes Green

Flavorwire (New York, NY), May 11, 2012   Summary: The Moth founder George Dawes Green says that the key to a really great story is vulnerability. “Great storytellers really never tell about triumphs — they always focus on weakness and loss, and their own humanity, their own clownishness.” “Getting other people to be quiet — …

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